WHOLISM AND THE NEW AGE

by Diane Brandon

The Societal or Larger Level

Page 7 of 11

Which brings us to another area of wholism -- the societal, or our interactions with others and our world.  How can we apply wholism to our interactions with that which is outside us?

 

Just as being whole means accepting all our own parts, it also implies accepting other people.  It means feeling a connection, rather than separation.  Just as Native Americans view all of life as interconnected, wholism as a world-view implies that we are part of a whole.  We are not only connected to other humans (both those we deem "bad," as well as "good"), but to all of life:  animals, plants, rocks, air.  We are part of an interconnecting and very complex web of life -- the ultimate symbiotic relationship.  Any time we separate ourselves from the whole, we are negating not only the whole, but also aspects of ourselves.

 

There are many ways in which we separate ourselves from the whole:  by judging others; by seeing ourselves as separate or different or better; by criticizing; by "shoulding" other people; by labeling.

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